Pbr extra

“Happier”: Wait, no… what are you… no! Not the dog, come on, man, not the dog, what are you doing to me, Marshmello? Okay, so here’s a form I’m not adequately equipped to categorize or compare to anything else: what’s stumping me is what to do with the three-bar space in between the pre-chorus and the solid chorus/refrain that’s introduced at the beginning. For now, I’m lumping it in with the chorus as part of a chorus variation. But you could also think of it as an extended part of the pre-chorus, especially as its lyric is taken from it. Or, I guess we could even call it an “interlude.” It’s slippery. I have to highlight the half-bridge that ends the song — you almost never see half-bridges.

At the same time, it’s pretty easy to dismiss this idea of using old video game sound chips to cover well-known tunes as just some kind of novelty gimmick.

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In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Ryan Tedder, a songwriter and the frontman of OneRepublic, once said: “With iPhones, nobody has an excuse for writer’s block. If you’re at Whole Foods getting your green tea extract and you have a melody, you just drop it into your voice memo and save it for later.” Going along with Ryan’s idea, if you have stockpiles of melodies and song snippets saved in your phone, go back to listen to them and you might find your “diamond in the rough” idea that will kickstart a new song for you.

Hopefully you have some ideas for crafting your own narrative now. Remember, your narrative doesn’t need to be groundbreaking, and even if you think you have nothing to say, you can find a story to share.

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Chantel De Lava’s soft synths and laid-bare vocals breathe new life into R&B-infused synthpop. Despite heavy use of electronics, the mix never loses warmth or depth of emotion, leaving room for more open sections and gorgeous vocal runs. Stay late for ZEMA, an electropop singer/producer who writes infectious tunes that will get your hips shakin’ of their own accord.

The structure of your songs has a big impact on the way your listeners will take them in. Writing lyrics and a catchy melody is one thing, but sculpting the journey that one is taken on as they move through a song is what separates the best songwriters on the planet from everyone else.